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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 186 (some duplicates have been removed)
were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appointee, catalina ruiz-healy. you can sit here. if you would like. >> good evening. superintendent, and new president and vice president and commissioners. thanks for having me. i was honored to receive your appointment in march, 2011, to be your appointee to the commission for the san francisco election department. you have received a memo from me. and i can go over it quickly, and i hope you had a chance to read it. but basically the city charter authorizes the election commission to supervisor the elections. and we are charged with a fairly narrow scope of work, for generally setting the department of elections and for the proper administration of the department. so the budget and we hire and fire the department of elections. so take a breath here. the way that the commission works on their on and off years. in 2011 our work focused on operations and less on policy. because we are getting ready to implement elections in the
this spring. >> it is election time in germany and the chancellor's competition's popularity plunges. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> hollande has announced the french troops have gone on an intervention in mali. this came a request for help out to the west african's country's president. >> they're continuing their drive southward. they already control two-thirds of the former french colony. >> they are on advance. they are now threatening to take this out as well. they are reported to have overrun the strategically important town in central mali. the army has so far been unable to recapture it. as the year grew that they could establish a safe haven for as long as the militants, there was growing pressure for assistance and now france has started military operations. >> french army forces gave their support this afternoon to units in mali to fight against terrorist elements. >> so far, the german government is holding back. >> a military solution alone will not solve the problem in mali. we must therefore intensify political efforts. >> in german
is a communication from the director of the department of elections or to certifying the official election of the order supervisors. districts 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11. and have been declared elected to that office. supervisor: mar, chiu, breed, campos, avalos. the second communication is a communication from the controller renewing the certification of the bond for the newly elected in the elected members of the board of supervisors. >> we will now proceed to the oath of office. >> i would like to welcome and introduce the honorable cynthia ming-mei lee, presiding judge, supuerior court of california. who will administer the oath of office to the following individuals: david campos eric mar john avaols myself mornam yee london breed. >> judge lee: good to be here. please come forward. would the supervisors being sworn in prer fer to stand? you all have to agree on. >> judge lee: would you all please raise your right hand? please state your name after "i". repeat after me. i do solemnly swear or affirm that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states. and the constituti
the next item. >> members will proceed with election of the office of president of the board of supervisors. >> president: on january 8, the board of supervisors is required to select the president from its members with a majority vote under city charter. madam clerk can you describe the principles. >> boys requirements state that there are no extensions; all supervisors must vote; lowest vote getter is not obligated to withdraw the name and will continue to be included in subsequent ballots. nominated name can withdraw their name anytime. as the president stated in the event that no nominee receives a majority vote the shelby additional roll calls until the nominee receives the majority and president is elected. the names of the supervisors who have been nominated for the election to the office a board president are: supervisor david chiu, supervisor cohen supervisor kim. board rule 5/20 states that the roll call vote will take place enough of a quarter. supervisor avalos will begin with you. please indicate your preference from among the money stated. >> president
of the obama administration with david axelrod, the man most responsible for the election of the president in two successive political campaigns. >> in fact, when we were going over the jokes there was one joke about tim pawlenty, it was poor tim pawlenty, he has such promise except for that unfortunate middle dame bin laden. he said that is so hackneyed, he said in retrospect that is so yesterday. let's take that out. and then the next night when i heard about the raid, i thought my god, he knew when he was sitting there that he had made this decision. he went and performed a brilliantly that night at the white house correspondent dinner, not a trace of anxiety, though he must have felt it. and you know that is an important quality in a prident of the united states, to be able to make decisions on the basis of the best information you have and live with those decisions. >> rose: david axelrod for the hour next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: david axelro
breed, newly elected to represent district 5. (applause) >> supervisor breed: so, i actually have -- thank you supervisor cohen -- i delivered a speech earlier today. i don't want to send you through all the motions. i'm going to say how excited i am to be here, how proud i am to be the district 5 supervisor, to represent the district that i call home my entire life. the city people at the swearing-in that we held this morning at 10 a.m.; to see my colleagues in the mayor, so many people from the community, my family, my friends it was truly an honor. i held is wearing in earlier because i did not want ms. johnson to walk to the chamber door and be turned away; i do not want the people that i grew up with, my friends and family, people that i was raised with to not have a seat; i want to introduce my special guests, my little brother, the rest of the family. how long is the other one going to be? we will see you later. will see you at the reception. my little brother is handicapped with me, paul, please stand. don't mess with me. my brother is not that little. he and i
the president was making his last campaign speech this year, late at night on the eve of the election. i will be thinking about the journey that we've taken together. we, you know, i met barack obama 20 years ago. and we've been working together now for ten. and in a sense we came together at a time when we both were going through a kind of midlife professional crisis. he wondering whether he should continue in politics, me wondering whether i wanted to continue as a consultant because i felt it was becoming so hard edged and cynical. and i said to him after the election, i said he gave me my idealism become and i'm really grateful for that. so i will be thinking about the journey we took together. >> rose: he is an idealistic man. >> i believe he is. he's pragmatic. you know, i think he's very, very pragmatic. and that's a great quality in a very complicated worldment but he's in public life for a reason. charlie, the world separates-- world politics separates into two categories. the people without go into it because they want to be something. and the people without go into it because
. >> and it is legacy material. he won re-election on -- one of only eight presidents to win two terms by 51% of the popular vote. what does he use that mandate for? also -- >> that's your question. when are you going to do what you got there to do? stop worrying about getting there again. >> the presidents don't always just follow public opinion, they have to shape public opinion. >> can i ask you -- okay. i'm a suburbanite city mouse. i generally have lived in suburban areas, but i don't know why you need a gun show. i mean, if you want to buy a gun, you go to a dealer. why do you have to have a show? why does it have to be a big hotel opens its doors to a bunch of gun salesmen and people -- >> well -- >> why do you have to have a gun show? >> far be it from me to comment in depth on gun culture, but i do think it's fun. gun shows are fun. it's like auto shows. >> you walk out with -- >> if you have the universal background check that the governor is talking about, then fine. the problem with gun shows is they're used as a huge loophole to sell a lot of unregulated guns. that's the problem
. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open for the nomination of president for board 2013. >> i would like to nominate our current vice president, rachel norton. >> any further? if no more, i declare the nomination closed. >> commissioner norton, i would like to move that we elect commissioner norton by acclimation. that needs a second. >> second. >> any other discussion? okay, we are good. thank you very much. [applause] i have the pleasure to announce that i have been elected president of the board. [laughter] i am now declaring nominations open for the office of vice president of the board of education for the year of 2013. any nominations? commissioner mendoza. >> it would be my honor to nominate sandra fewer. >> i think we will close the n
election. but most of them, honestly, were from the republican primaries. come on. very few of the laugh out loud moments from the last election involved president obama himself telling a laugh out loud deadpan joke. but it did happen once. >> i think governor romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works. you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater. nuclear submarines. >> ships that go underwater. after that moment in the third presidential debate last year there was a brief but fascinating flurry of really earnest fact checking about the question of whether or not there really are fewer bayonets in the u.s. military right now. remember? tmz had an exclusive inside scoop on outrage from the bayonet community. "we are not obsolete." in fact, the last famous bayonet charge in american history was in 1951 during the ko
? and are you completely committed to stepping down as president of the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered. by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization. to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then-host government, we achieved our central goal. which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal, which is to decompass tate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure that they can't attack us again. and everything that we've done over the last ten years, from the prospective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be
their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would be bereft of any protection. >> what kind of country are we going to find? >> a deeply divided country. it is divided, as you saw, from those that don't like him and those that adore him. that is not a social divide. in which the middle class doesn't like him and the poor does. 45% voted against him. the country doesn't have a middle class. in order to get 45% of the vote, that means the millions of poor people voted against him, but people also voted for him. they have a very strong an almost spiritual connection with
. >> yeah. so, look, all in all, how is 2013 going to be compared to 2012? we have u.s. elections, i.t. companies, business from the u.s. there's a lot of uncertainty over the fiscal cliff. has there been a withdraw of investment but maybe it will bounce back? albeit, you've still got to get through debt ceiling and other negotiations. >> i think 2013 compared to 2012 and 2013, 2013 will be more positive. for the election year in europe and considering most of the companies infrastructure is more than 50% of the exposure to the u.s. market. most companies who have their renewal budgets, they tried to push it to the next year, the election budgets. so most companies do have good exposure to the u.s. i think 2013 is still better than 2013 compared to 2012. >> there's a lot of talk about on-shoring of business by the u.s. certainly with regard to manufacturing, you've got the natural gas boom in the u.s. which is making it much more attractive for the u.s. to manufacture stuff on-shore as well as 3g, 2g manufacturing. are there any factors on the software side that can have an impact on
he won the election, wendell willkie, fuji beach, was in the office and they remained friends. he said to the president why do you keep that man so close to you, that man being hopkins. wilkie didn't like hopkins and roosevelt said you know, you may be in this office some day and you'll understand. but he asks for nothing except to serve me. >>> now to the university of alabama law school in tuscaloosa for a discussion of labor and employment law. civil rights leaders and retired federal judge u.w. clemon spoke to students about the history of title seven of the civil rights act. this is about an hour. >> on behalf of the society and the american constitutional society, we'd like to welcome you all today to a remarkable speaker, the honorable u.w. clemon. the former chief judge of the united states district court for the northern district of alabama. long before his notable career on the federal bench, justice u.w. clemon distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, lawyer and alabama state senator. as a student educated in the segregated public schools of jefferson county, h
. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fighting and those sorts of things. it's dangerous ground for any politician because of that. >> we are seeing
of the seven u.s. presidents re-elected since world war ii have been less popular in the second terms. so can the president use early momentum to push the policy agenda? let's spin. guys, i have been saying for a while now i think that his second term he's going the see a lot more pushback from the friends on the left than his foes on the right. for one, he's been re-elected. i think the gop has generally resigned themselves to the fact that they're going to be four more years to obama and they have a little less incentive to hang him for every misstep he has but democrats are incentives to watch him more carefully. one, payment, you know, a number of groups, unions for one, invested heavily in barack obama's re-election and i'm sure they want some roi now. two, accountability on the promises the president made in the first term, promises on gay marriage, promises on immigration, maybe promises on guns now. and third, this idea of a liberal legacy. think i that a number of folks on the left were willing to forego or ignore some of the issues in his first term that now they're looking at. the
in the last election. wherever they can they'll turn against the president and his appointees. it's as simple as that. >> jennifer: do you think the white house, because of his previous confirmations being relatively easy, do you think the president thought lou's confirmation would be easy as well. >> no, i don't. the president came in and i got to hear from all of them. i will tell that you they are really of the understanding now and it's very different from the first year, the first administration that the non-stop partisan wear warfare from the republicans will continue. the only way to deal with this is to confront it. i think that they're determined to make sure the president has his own team in place at the cabinet and his policies will be implemented. >> jennifer: this is so interesting to me, do you think that suggests what you said there, that he's not going to be bowed by what will be objections by the senate no matter what. they're going to come no matter what. he'll put in place the team that he wants. if that isn't the case, why wouldn't he have stuck with susan rice, for exampl
it was unaware of the pastor's prior stance at the time he was elected. a new study has found up to half of all food worldwide is going to waste. britain's institution of mechanical engineers sayat least 1.2 billion of the 4 billion tons of food produced each year is thrown out due to problems with harvesting, transporting and storage, as well as wasteful behavior from sellers and consumers. the report calls food wastage -- the findings come as nations across the globe continue to grapple with soaring food prices. brendan cox of the group save the children said the soaring food costs threaten to cause more unnecessary deaths. >> there is a new normal of the food crisis. and the last year we have seen wheat increased by 25%. already around 3 million children die every year as a result of malnutrition. what could happen next year could make the situation much worse. >> fears of a spike in food prices have run after a long standing drought prompted the obama administration to declare a natural disaster in large parts of the midwest. conditions in the courtroom and we producing states -- kansas, co
. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what jumps out at you. help us decode what was in that meeting, what was most pournt. >> is think what jumped out at me mostly was the acceleration in the transition. which i think is good. that american troops are going to be leaving at a faster clip. and also on the function side, so to speak that the role of american troops in combat as was mentioned in the clip is going to be phased out. also, what president karz
was about keeping washington in check. not this time. >> presidents have a way of getting re-elected and deciding how about i do what i want to do. how about i choose who i'm comfortable with. and they have extra confidence that they can do that. and they should be able to do it. and -- >> there is sort of -- you know, it's -- by the way, it's also why they've had this diversity issue a little bit, not thinking about that. >> it doesn't explain why he didn't stand behind susan rice. if that was really his view. he's choosing the fight over hagel, in part i'm sure because he gave up on susan rice. why didn't he do it for her? >> it's possible he never was for susan the way others were. there really was a split in that white house. >> it looked like it had touched a personal cord with him when she was being criticized. may be separate from whether he wanted her for the job. i think the attitude is what's driving this on hagel. and i think his comfort level, his knowledge that if he's going to deal with defense budget cuts, he wants a republican in there. i'm not sure as andrea mitchell
. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of treasury. dave clark from politico joins us to learn a little bit more about him. to the caller pose a question about his background, particularly about wall street, can you tell us and on his experiences there and what he brings to the white house? caller: most of his background is predominantly a denture washington. he was a top house aide for a long time. he worked in the clinton administration. in the obama administration he was also the director as well working at the state department. he did spend two or three years, 200
. of course from is a political dimension to this. japanese vote again in july in the election for the upper house and abe needs to show he's doing something to speed the recovery. >> there's a lot of money involved. the question is will it work? >> certainly these measures will provide a temporary boost but they will not solve the underlying problems. abe says he'll build his economic policy on three pillars -- increased public spending, monetary easing and doing more to encourage growth. we've seen in the stimulus how abe plans to spend taxpayers' money. on top of that he is urging the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2% and to get more money flowing through the economy. the lines on the final pillar measures toward growth are less clear. some have insisted sustainable growth will only come by making industries more competitive through deregulation. but, government leaders have yet to articulate how they'll make that happen. >> you just mentioned this could be a temporary boost. i guess the question is what does abe need to do in the longer term. >> the labor force is shrinking.
all. >> next speaker. >> president chiu, supervisors, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good that supervisor cohen was selected as the person to be president. and i want to offer my own support of that cause. supervisor breed, you stated something about doctor king. i thought i might leave this quote with you. for doctor king said, "change does not roll in on the wheels of ineligibility, but comes through continuous struggle. men cannot ride you unless your back is bent." i hope you see this time of change of having a woman of color as a president of this board. >> president: next speaker. >> good day board. president chiu and other board members here. my name is ross rhodes, as part of the organization call ace. i'm here speaking on behalf of my other fellow brothers and sisters in the organiz
that much of this is de influence of foreigners? will you stand down for elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because thousand americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place, and because of the core with worked of our men and women in uniform and because of the corporation and the sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by the then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving the central goal -- which is to decapaticate al qaeda. everything we have done over the last 10 years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that came. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that were made by those men and wo
to know my italian friends introduce me as david chiu o. 20 years ago like every elected that didn't grow up in san francisco and i know we are all from different areas i came here 20 years ago from the east coast and in part i was fascinated by chinatown and it's next to the old italian neighborhood of north beach and in the great cities like boston et cetera and when i walked around that neighborhood it was the neighborhood that drew me to the great city whether being reminded of great baseball players, the joe migage i don't play ground. >> >> or the fisherman or the piazza that i look forward to work with angela to lobby the mayor to adequately fund it. there are special quarters that come from the community that are represented tonight and i am happy to come and raise a glass to all of you and look forward to cel celebrating the italian. >> american history. thank you. >> good evening. i am verna patty. i am coming from congresswoman pelosi's office. she is celebrating in washington dc the italian culture with the minister. "dr. friends greetings as you. >> >> gather in san fran
, such that they have to, you know, that's what they need to do to win their go into general election they will he' lose to more moderate sounding democrats on this issue, and that democrats retake control of the house? >> well, i'd like to see harry reid with so many of his members from red states vulnerable in the coming election, and like to see the response he gets if he proposes to bring forward any serious gun restriction. i don't think it's coming out of the senate. i think too many in the senate majority leader's caucus would say no thank you, no thank you, mr. reid, the chances of a vote coming in the house-- >> see you soon. fly-over country or the heartland. in colorado, a state that's seen its fair share of tragic shootings, the state's legislature is considering several bills to regulate guns. as lawmakers worked earlier this week, 150 worried guns rights activists quietly marched outside to protest the still unwritten been control measures. here is more from the new democratic speaker of the house and some in the crowd. >> a lot of these things can be preempted or eliminated altogether if
? >> this is a worrying sign for the stability of pakistan as it enters a very sensitive period. elections are due to take place within the next three or four months and there are many pakistanis who worry that if the security situation continues to spiral out of control such as it appeared to be doing today that this could create the circumstances where the political process could be in danger even of being derailed. >> suarez: declan walsh reporting from islamabad, thanks for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> brown: next, new mortgage rules from the government, designed to clamp down on risky lending practices. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: at the root of the 2008 credit and housing bust were risky, even reckless mortgages made to customers who couldn't afford them. today the new consumer financial protection bureau issued regulations spelling out how lenders must ensure borrowers can repay their loans. banks that follow the criteria would be protected from most lawsuits. to meet the standard of a qualified mortgage, a bank would have to verify the borrower's income, employment and total debt,
and are you completely committed to stepping down as president after the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went in to afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is or have come very close to achieving our central goal which is to deca pass tate al qaeda and dismantle them. everything that we have done over the last ten years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that aim. and, you know, at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that w
as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through the u.s.-afghan women's council. the council is a public private partnership that has been housed here at the university since 2008. it was founded in 2002 by president karzai and president bush in support of afghan women and children. it's focused its work of areas of education, health, economic empowerment, leadership development, and humanitarian assistance. since its founding the council has created call laarships, provided skills training, litteracy and health care, established a burn center to treat victims and provide reconstructive surgery and provide leadership training for afghan women. in recent years we have witnessed significant improvements of the lives of women and children throughout afghanistan. educational opportunitie
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 186 (some duplicates have been removed)